Our oceans and the life forms therein are diverse and incredible but they are
in trouble.

The coral reefs are dying as a result of climate change. Destructive fishing
practices are causing a radical decline in fish and the sea life we depend on.
Each one of us can take action to help our oceans.

The Ocean Project suggests that the first two step are
            to choose seafood that is in abundant supply, and that is responsibly
              fished or farmed without harm to the ocean and coasts
            to calculate our
carbon footprint and find ways to reduce our impact
              on climate change.
www.theoceanproject.org/

If you live at the coast organise a coastal clean-up, and be very aware of
plastic getting into our oceans.

World Oceans Day began on 8 June 1992 at the Earth Summit in
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

In 2009, the United Nations officially declared
June 8th as World Oceans Day.


Wear Blue Tell Two
  The world's oceans cover more than 70% of our planet's surface, yet less
    than 1% of our ocean habitat is protected.

  The ocean plays a critical role in maintaining the planet's ecosystems and
    is essential to human health and well being.

  We rely on seafood as a means of food.

  The oceans are also the "roads" for international trade. More than
    $500 billion of the world's economy is tied to ocean-based industries such
    as coastal tourism and shipping.

  Our oceans help regulate the global climate and ensure that a constant
    flow of vital nutrients is cycled throughout the biosphere.

Unfortunately the diversity of life in estuaries, coastal waters and oceans is
threatened due to

  increased pressures from overfishing (over-consumption of fish has
    resulted in drastically dwindling population of a majority of species)

  habitat destruction

  unsustainable coastal development

  global pollution and litter

  the introduction of invasive alien species

  global warming



Climate Change and Global Warming's Effect

Examining growth rings from trees and ice cores drilled in Antarctica, scientists have determined
that the past decade was the warmest in more than four centuries, and that the current rate of
warming is probably unprecedented in at least 10,000 years. 1998 was the hottest year since accurate
records began in the 1840s, and ten of the hottest years have occurred during the last 15 years.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded in 1992 that the warming is caused in
part by emissions of greenhouse gases from fossil fuel use.

Global warming is predicted to increase rapidly, with average annual temperatures expected to
increase by about 3C by the middle of the next century.

For more on Global Warming
click here

Such changes could set off a chain reaction in marine ecosystems with shocking consequences for
life in the sea and for human communities that depend on it.

Some of the consequences of global warming on our oceans include:

  Rising sea-levels.
      Rising oceans could flood many millions of hectares of valuable coastal ecosystems world-wide.

  The effect on ocean circulation
      The water in the oceans circulates around the world, driven by a complex system of currents.

      Wind and the rotation of the Earth determine the flow of surface currents and local areas of
        up-welling and downwelling. But the driving force of deep water movement is thermohaline
        circulation, known as the ocean conveyer belt. This mechanism, which is triggered by the
        sinking of cold water in certain polar regions, takes oxygen to the deepest parts of the sea, and
        moves warmer waters from the tropics towards the poles.

      Increased precipitation, melting of polar glaciers and ice caps, as a result of global warming
        could block the system by reducing the amount of cold water that sinks downwards. The
        consequences of shutting down the conveyer belt would be devastating for marine life.

  The effect on the Polar regions

      The most obvious signs of global warming changes being observed are in the regions near the
        poles.

      The ice-edge in the Antarctic is retreating. A portion of the Larsen ice shelf collapsed in 1995
        and large areas of two more ice sheets shattered into the sea in 1999.

      Arctic ice masses appear to be thinning and seasonal ice is forming later and melting earlier.
  
      Scientific data is backed up by the observations of indigenous communities in the Arctic. Global
        warming may threaten a whole way of life for these subsistence communities.

      In 1997 and 1998 massive blooms of marine algae in the Arctic were easily visible from space
        (these were not previously visible). In the Antarctic, declines in Adlie penguin and crabeater
        seal populations have been linked to altered snow and ice conditions, and warming has also
        been linked to reduced numbers of krill.

  The effect on coral reefs

      Coral reefs are home to an extraordinarily rich array of marine life and provide vital resources
        to the tourism and fishing industries.

      Marine biologists note that 1997 and 1998 saw the worst episode of coral bleaching, due to
        high sea temperatures, with more than 30 nations reporting losses in their reefs. More than
        90% of coral died in some areas in the Indian Ocean.

      Evidence suggests that the increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may be
        harmful for reefs as it weakens corals' calcium carbonate skeletons and makes them more
        susceptible to storm damage and other erosion.

      Mobile-gear fishing is a threat in the case of deep sea corals.

  The effect on seabirds and invertebrates

      Global warming is expected to decrease ocean productivity. Zooplankton in the California
        Current have decreased more than 70% since the 1950s, and may explain dramatic declines
        in seabirds like sooty shearwaters and Cassin's auklets in recent years.

Source:
WWF (1999) Global Warming: The Oceans in Peril.World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and
Marine Conservation Biology Institute (MCBI)


What We Can Do

It is critical to educate the public, and promote a consciousness of our responsibility.
Use this day to get directly involved in protecting our seas and to increase our consciousness of how
much we depend on the world's oceans.

  Do a beach cleanup

  Be aware of your waste disposal and litter practices

  Get involved in educational programs

  Create a sustainable seafood event (ensure that you select seafood from the Green List)

  Support the SASSI programme


Useful links

www.theoceanproject.org/
http://worldoceansday.org/

 
 
World Ocean
Day

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Theme
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Wear Blue
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Climate Change
Effect

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What We Can Do
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Useful Links
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SASSI
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Litter
....................................................

Other Campaigns
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Home
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Reduce
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Reuse
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About Greenworks

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Recycle

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Respect & Responsibility
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Global Warming
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Green Tip of the Week
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Watch Your Waste
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Compost
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Get SASSI
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Litter
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Products
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Contact Us
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Daily Checklist
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Your Carbon Footprint
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Environmental Calendar
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Office Greening
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Landfills
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Plant a Tree for Life
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Campaigns
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Earth Hour
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Earth Day
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World Environment Day
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World Ocean Day
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Arbor Day
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Christmas
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World Oceans Day
8 June


World Oceans Day is an annual celebration and call to action for the
protection of the world's oceans.


World Oceans Day is an opportunity to honour the oceans and products they
provide. It is also a chance to build an awareness of the role of the ocean in
our lives and the how we can help.

The theme for 2011 & 2012 is Youth: the Next Wave for Change


Video courtesy One World One Ocean